andrewpylesmcgee.tumblr.com/aboutme


socialjusticekoolaid:

Protesters from across St Louis turned up and turned out for the first St Louis County Council Meeting since Mike Brown’s Death. (Part I)

The St Louis County Council wasn’t as bad as Ferguson’s Council, but still very few answers and virtually no accountability from the folks who unleashed unholy hell on the residents of Ferguson, following Brown’s murder. #staywoke #farfromover



bobbycaputo:

Here’s Why We Need to Protect Public Libraries

We live in a “diverse and often fractious country,” writes Robert Dawson, but there are some things that unite us—among them, our love of libraries. “A locally governed and tax-supported system that dispenses knowledge and information for everyone throughout the country at no cost to its patrons is an astonishing thing,” the photographer writes in the introduction to his book, The Public Library: A Photographic Essay. “It is a shared commons of our ambitions, our dreams, our memories, our culture, and ourselves.”

But what do these places look like? Over the course of 18 years, Dawson found out. Inspired by “the long history of photographic survey projects,” he traveled thousands of miles and photographed hundreds of public libraries in nearly all 50 states. Looking at the photos, the conclusion is unavoidable: American libraries are as diverse as Americans. They’re large and small, old and new, urban and rural, and in poor and wealthy communities. Architecturally, they represent a range of styles, from the grand main branch of the New York Public Library to the humble trailer that serves as a library in Death Valley National Park, the hottest place on Earth. “Because they’re all locally funded, libraries reflect the communities they’re in,” Dawson said in an interview. “The diversity reflects who we are as a people.”

(Continue Reading)


If you take a book with you on a journey,…an odd thing happens: The book begins collecting your memories. And forever after you have only to open that book to be back where you first read it. It will all come into your mind with the very first words: the sights you saw in that place, what it smelled like, the ice cream you ate while you were reading it…yes, books are like flypaper—memories cling to the printed page better than anything else.
-Cornelia Funke, Inkheart  (via theflowershop)

(Source: skysailing-mu)


Privacy is a privilege. It is rarely enjoyed by women or transgender men and women, queer people or people of color. When you are an Other, you are always in danger of having your body or some other intimate part of yourself exposed in one way or another. A stranger reaches out and touches a pregnant woman’s belly. A man walking down the street offers an opinion on a woman’s appearance or implores her to smile. A group of teenagers driving by as a person of color walks on a sidewalk shout racial slurs, interrupting their quiet.

For most people, privacy is little more than an illusion, one we create so we can feel less vulnerable as we move through the world, so we can believe some parts of ourselves are sacred and free from uninvited scrutiny. The further away you are from living as a white, heterosexual, middle-class man, the less privacy you enjoy – the more likely your illusions of privacy will be shattered when you least expect it.

-The Great Naked Celebrity Photo Leak of 2014 is just the beginning | Roxane Gay | theguardian.com (via becauseiamawoman)

bisexual-books:

We (Ellie and Sarah) were in Chicago today and this was the main window display at Women and Children First, the feminist book store.  
On the cardboard where it says “Rest In Power” are the names of murdered black people, from Mike Brown to Islan Nettles to ‘my friend’s student’.    To the left two signs read “Injustice is a Feminist Issue” and “Ferguson is a Feminist Issue”.   On the right a sign says “The idea that some lives matter LESS is the root of all that is wrong in the world”.  Below is a selection of books on African American issues or by African American authors, focusing on feminist, womanist, and LGBT themes.  
Across the bottom is a quote by bisexual African Caribbean-American poet and author June Jordan (that’s her yellow book to the left called Some Of Us Did Not Die, which is amazing btw).  The quote reads:

"And what shall we do, we who did not die?  What shall we do now?  How shall we grieve, and cry out loud, and face down despair?  Is there an honorable, non-violent means towards mourning and remembering who and what we loved?"

bisexual-books:

We (Ellie and Sarah) were in Chicago today and this was the main window display at Women and Children First, the feminist book store.  
On the cardboard where it says “Rest In Power” are the names of murdered black people, from Mike Brown to Islan Nettles to ‘my friend’s student’.    To the left two signs read “Injustice is a Feminist Issue” and “Ferguson is a Feminist Issue”.   On the right a sign says “The idea that some lives matter LESS is the root of all that is wrong in the world”.  Below is a selection of books on African American issues or by African American authors, focusing on feminist, womanist, and LGBT themes.  
Across the bottom is a quote by bisexual African Caribbean-American poet and author June Jordan (that’s her yellow book to the left called Some Of Us Did Not Die, which is amazing btw).  The quote reads:

"And what shall we do, we who did not die?  What shall we do now?  How shall we grieve, and cry out loud, and face down despair?  Is there an honorable, non-violent means towards mourning and remembering who and what we loved?"

bisexual-books:

We (Ellie and Sarah) were in Chicago today and this was the main window display at Women and Children First, the feminist book store.  

On the cardboard where it says “Rest In Power” are the names of murdered black people, from Mike Brown to Islan Nettles to ‘my friend’s student’.    To the left two signs read “Injustice is a Feminist Issue” and “Ferguson is a Feminist Issue”.   On the right a sign says “The idea that some lives matter LESS is the root of all that is wrong in the world”.  Below is a selection of books on African American issues or by African American authors, focusing on feminist, womanist, and LGBT themes.  

Across the bottom is a quote by bisexual African Caribbean-American poet and author June Jordan (that’s her yellow book to the left called Some Of Us Did Not Die, which is amazing btw).  The quote reads:

"And what shall we do, we who did not die?  What shall we do now?  How shall we grieve, and cry out loud, and face down despair?  Is there an honorable, non-violent means towards mourning and remembering who and what we loved?"



thelesbianguide:

I love the rain. I have the rainymood track on my ipod. It’s calming and relieves my stress & anxiety. I never thought looking at .gifs of rain would give me the same sensation as hearing it. So I thought because this did it I’d share it with anyone who’s been feeling a little tense lately. Hopefully it has the same effect on you as it does me.

~ Va-J-J

(Source: candle-lighted)